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Charleston Silver Lecture

American College of the Building Arts silver lecture
Brandy Culp at the American College of the Building Arts
American College of the Building Arts silver lecture
Kaminer Haislip at the American College of the Building Arts

Charleston Silver Lecture by Brandy Culp and Kaminer Haislip

Brandy Culp, the Richard Koopman Curator of American Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum, and I have recently given several lecture presentations on Charleston silver, so I was inspired to write a blog post discussing our unique collaboration. We have presented to private organizations and groups and last week we gave a lecture on Charleston silver for the American College of the Building Arts. The pictures in this post are from that event.

Kaminer Haislip and Brandy Culp at their Charleston silver lecture
Kaminer Haislip and Brandy Culp at their Charleston silver lecture

When Brandy and I collaborate on a Charleston silver lecture, we begin with her discussing colonial Charleston history and silversmithing. She is an expert in the decorative arts field and in particular metalwork. Brandy earned her Master of Arts degree with an emphasis in American decorative arts from the Bard Graduate Center. There she completed her thesis on the 18th century Charleston silversmith Alexander Petrie and the Carolina silver trade. The topic of metalwork remains one of her greatest interests, and she is currently working on a permanent exhibition of the Wadsworth’s English and American silver collections.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Lecture attendees looking at Kaminer Haislip’s silversmithing tools, silver objects in progress, and finished silver items

Brandy ties my contemporary silversmithing brilliantly to historic forms and processes. I discuss in detail how I design and create my original, silver designs and use tools and in progress silver items to illustrate the relationship between my silversmithing techniques and past silversmith practices. Additionally, I bring a selection of finished silver hollowware, flatware, and jewelry for attendees to see in person during the lecture and up close after our slide presentation is over.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Brandy Culp with lecture guests

We always save time for a question and answer session at the end of our lecture and spend time with guests after the event to take additional questions and socialize.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
John Paul Huguley and Kaminer Haislip after the lecture
American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Brandy Culp with guests after the lecture

Brandy and I both are incredibly passionate about silver and very much enjoy sharing our silver knowledge. The combination of her historic metalwork expertise and my contemporary silver designs has been extremely well received each time we have done a presentation. If you are interested in having us speak to your group, organization, or college, then please email me at kaminer@kaminerhaislip.com. I can provide details, fees, and press material.

Thank you for your interest in silver!

Charleston Silversmithing, Traditions from Past to Present Lecture – March 7, 2019

Denis Diderot 1765 colonial silversmithing workshop
Charleston silversmith Kaminer Haislip

Charleston Silversmithing Lecture at American College of the Building Arts

Thursday, March 7 at 6pm

Brandy S. Culp, Richard Koopman Curator of American Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum, and I will give a lecture presentation titled Charleston Silversmithing, Traditions from Past to Present at the American College of the Building Arts in Charleston, SC about colonial Charleston silversmithing and how my contemporary silversmithing relates to it.

It is open to the public, but seating is limited and reservations can be made by emailing handall@acba.edu. There is no admissions fee for attending the lecture, however you may reserve a seat ahead of time by making a donation of any size that is meaningful to you. Included with your reservation is an invitation to meet the speakers at a private reception following the presentation. Without a reservation, seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.

Lecture Description:

In the eighteenth century, Charleston’s favorable economic circumstances spurred a healthy luxury goods market, especially the precious metal trades. Through the centuries, the tradition of creating and collecting metalwork has continued in the Carolina Lowcountry. Brandy S. Culp, Richard Koopman Curator of American Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum, will explore how the Holy City’s talented silversmiths and jewelers reflected the global exchange of ideas, people, and goods in early America. Ms. Culp will be joined by Kaminer Haislip, a nationally renowned and formally-trained silversmith practicing in Charleston. Together they will discuss how many of the tools and techniques employed by silversmiths and jewelers have changed very little over the centuries. From the combined perspective of a design historian and practicing silversmith, Ms. Culp and Ms. Haislip will present a splendid array of metalwork highlighting examples of Lowcountry silver—past and present—found both locally and in collections outside of the South, including notable objects in the Wadsworth’s holdings.

Brandy S. Culp is the Richard Koopman Curator of American Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum, America’s oldest continually-operating public art museum and stewards of a collection of over 50,000 artifacts spanning 5,000 years. There she has most recently curated the exhibitions, Simply Splendid: Rethinking American Design, Bed Furnishings in Early America, and Design in the American Home, 1650 to 1850. Prior to joining the Wadsworth, Culp served as Curator of Historic Charleston Foundation, leading projects for the conservation and interpretation of the Foundation’s collection of fine and decorative arts. Before that, Ms. Culp served as the Andrew W. Mellon Curatorial Fellow in the Department of American Art at the Art Institute of Chicago. She has also held positions at the Bard Graduate Center and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Culp graduated summa cum laude from Hollins University and received her Master of Arts degree with an emphasis in American decorative arts from the Bard Graduate Center. There she completed her thesis on the 18th century Charleston silversmith Alexander Petrie and the Carolina silver trade. The topic of metalwork remains one of her greatest interests, and she is currently working on a permanent exhibition of the Wadsworth’s English and American silver collections.

A native of Aiken, South Carolina, Kaminer Haislip grew up in her family’s hardware store. Amidst the story-telling locals and tools for sale, she was inspired at a young age to create three-dimensional objects ranging from sculpture to jewelry. Haislip received both a BFA in jewelry and metals and an MFA in silversmithing, design, and sculpture from Winthrop University, where she studied under Alfred Ward, an internationally acclaimed English silversmith. After graduating in 2005, she moved to Charleston and established her studio. Nationally recognized for her craftsmanship, Haislip was most recently featured in the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition Silver: Then and Now. Her handcrafted metalwork has been shown internationally and highlighted by numerous media outlets, including Antiques and Fine Art, Metalsmith, The Magazine Antiques, Traditional Home, Elle Décor, Garden & Gun, Southern Living, Charleston Magazine, and Handcrafted America. Haislip has also collaborated with Reese Witherspoon’s southern lifestyle company, Draper James, to create exclusive objects that reflect the South’s rich metalworking history.

Inspired by Charleston’s extensive silversmithing tradition, Haislip is dedicated to carrying forth that legacy. Hand-forging her flatware, hollowware, and jewelry, she uses the very tools and techniques employed by silversmiths for centuries, yet her metalwork reflects her unique approach to contemporary design.

American College of the Building Arts
649 Meeting Street
Community Room
Charleston, SC 29403
http://www.acba.edu

Charleston Gallery Representation

Helena Fox Fine Art Charleston art gallery
silver coffeepot with purple heart wood handle
This silver and purple heart wood coffeepot is now sold exclusively through
Helena Fox Fine Art.

Charleston Gallery Representation

I am extremely excited to announce Helena Fox Fine Art is now representing my handcrafted silver designs in their stunning downtown Charleston art gallery! They are now carrying on an on going basis a curated selection of my silver hollowware, flatware, home objects, and jewelry. Some items, such as the silver coffeepot shown above, will be sold exclusively through them. Noted on my website Shop are those items, so you must get in contact with them or visit their gorgeous art gallery in order to purchase them.

They are formally welcoming me on Friday, March 1 from 5-8pm during the Charleston Gallery Association artwalk. During that event and on Saturday, March 2 from 11am-4pm, a wider selection of my silver home objects and jewelry will be shown. I hope to see you at one of those events!

Helena Fox Fine Art historic downtown Charleston art gallery South of Broad
Helena Fox Fine Art is located in the historic South of Broad neighborhood in downtown Charleston, SC

Helena Fox Fine Art
106-A Church Street
Charleston, SC 29401
www.helenafoxfineart.com

Helena Fox Fine Art – March 1, 2019

helena fox fine art
Helena Fox Fine Art gallery downtown Charleston South of Broad

Helena Fox Fine Art welcomes Charleston Silversmith Kaminer Haislip

CHARLESTON, SC, March 1, 2019 – – Helena Fox Fine Art, LLC is pleased to welcome Kaminer Haislip, Silversmith to the gallery.

We are thrilled to announce that silversmith Kaminer Haislip will be joining our gallery in March. Join us on Friday March 1, 2019 to welcome Silversmith Kaminer Haislip to the gallery—artist reception from 5-8pm during the Charleston Gallery Association spring artwalk.

Ms. Haislip’s work expands our idea of what can be done with sterling silver. Using basically the same techniques as colonial silversmiths Kaminer creates sleek and sculptural objects for the home as well as sophisticated jewelry. Many of her pieces have hidden meanings—such as the ‘nest bowl.’ In the object you see the layering of larger and smaller sterling wires that intertwine to create a bowl shape, much like you might see in a birds nest. Many of her designs are modern interpretations of the world around us, such as her ‘Oyster’ series of jewelry which echoes the familiar shape of an oyster shell in sterling wire. 

‘I like silversmithing,” Kaminer explains, “because it is midway between sculpture and jewelry.” Laughing she adds, “although my parents wanted me to make jewelry since it was more practical as a career.” After earning her MFA in silversmithing from Winthrop University in 2005, Southern tastemakers began seeking her out for her striking pieces. Among them Southern sweetheart and founder of lifestyle brand Draper James, Reese Witherspoon. She found Ms. Haislip through the Garden and Gun Made in the South awards where Ms. Haislip was a runner up in the overall home wares division in 2012.

Join us on March 1st and give our newest artist a warm welcome. Jewelry and home objects will be on display with a larger selection available through Saturday March 2nd.

Helena Fox Fine Art

106A Church Street

Charleston, SC 29401

843-723-0073

www.helenafoxfineart.com

Drawing as a Starting Point

silver purple heart teapot drawing kaminer haislip design
Drawing by Kaminer Haislip for her silver and purple heart teapot Corresponding to an echo as it travels (teapot II)
silver purple heart teapot silversmith Kaminer Haislip
Silver and purple heart teapot Corresponding to an echo as it travels (teapot II) made by Kaminer Haislip

Drawing as a Starting Point

I am frequently asked how I come up with my ideas and develop them into silver artworks, so this Blog post discusses how I use drawing as a starting point for my design process. When an idea inspires me to create a new hollowware piece or jewelry series, I begin designing by loosely sketching in my sketchbook. As the form or shape of a piece begins to take shape, I refine the rendering with correct proportions and details.

silver pitcher drawing artist rendering product design
Drawing by Kaminer Haislip of her silver pitcher
Corresponding to an echo as it travels (pitcher II)
silver pitcher functional art contemporary silver
Silver pitcher Corresponding to an echo as it travels (pitcher II)
created by Kaminer Haislip

Once I have chosen the final form from the various refined renderings, I draw the object or jewelry piece to scale of the actual item on Canson paper using graphite pencils and Prisma Color Pencils (media of all three drawings included in this post). The design continues to evolve in the to scale state with decisions made about handle size, spout curve, and overall proportions of the object. It is much easier, faster, and more economical to change the design on paper than it is in silver!

My drawings also assist me in the pricing of an object or jewelry piece, because they tell me the exact size of silver sheet or wire to purchase.

silver pitcher and cup drawing beaker tumbler designer silversmith
Sounding Series pitcher and beaker design drawing by Kaminer Haislip
Silver pitcher contemporary silver designer silversmith functional art tabletop design
Silver Sounding Series Pitcher handcrafted by Kaminer Haislip

silver beaker cup tumbler tabletop design product design
Silver Sounding Series Beaker handcrafted by Kaminer Haislip

I follow the same path when beginning a client’s custom commission design. Based on conversations I have with a client on their vision or concept for a custom object or jewelry piece, I use those specifics to begin designing a unique, one of a kind piece especially for them. The collaboration between client and artist is a process I very much enjoy! A new artwork I would not have thought of on my own emerges from the collaboration and it challenges me to think outside of my regular work zone.

To view examples of commission drawings and finished pieces I have custom designed, visit the Commission page on this website. To commission me to create a one of a kind design, email me directly at kaminer@kaminerhaislip.com.

To learn more about my process from paper to silver, visit the Handcrafted Design page on this website. Also stay tuned for more Blog posts about my handcrafted process. Thank you for your interest in my artwork!

Processional Torch Commission

processional torches brass silver walnut episcopal church custom design
Processional Torches by Kaminer Haislip in silver, brass, and
black walnut by Moran Woodworked Furniture
Photography by Jack Alterman

Processional Torch Commission

Kaminer Haislip designed and created this processional torch commission in collaboration with Michael James Moran and Celia Gibson of Moran Woodworked Furniture. A group of St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church patrons contacted Kaminer to commission these custom processional torches in memory of Bishop Daly Pope Garnett. Bishop was a dear friend to Kaminer and her brother Wylie’s lifelong best friend, so this project meant a lot and she was committed to making it exceptional. When the wood components were considered during the early design stages, Kaminer knew who to call to collaborate with on that crucial element. She had collaborated with Michael and Celia on numerous occasions before and knew they had an eye and mind for the aesthetic and technical challenges that lay ahead on this complex project.

silver and brass candleholder processional torch bespoke ecclesiastic commission
Silver and brass candleholder for processional torch by Kaminer Haislip
with black walnut stem by Moran Woodworked Furniture
Hand Engraving by Kristina McClure
Photography by Jack Alterman

The design for the custom processional torches began with looking at the church’s existing collection of ceremonial objects and torches, so the new, handcrafted torches would be unified in the environment. Measurements were taken of existing torches and Kaminer, Micheal, and Celia considered the ergonomics when finalizing the dimensions, since these torches were intended for the youth church members to carry. The silver and brass candleholder was inspired by a previous silver candlestick Kaminer had created, but reimagined with a smooth, round dish referencing angel wings. Due to the slight tilt in each silver dish, when the two are placed together (see first image above) they symbolize angel wings soaring high.

The brass cylinder of the candleholder was beautifully hand engraved by the talented Kristina McClure, who does all of Kaminer’s hand engraving. The inscription credits Bishop’s mother’s afternoon tea group as “The Teabags” for their generous donation of the processional torches to St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church.

processional torch candleholder hand engraved custom commission bespoke church design
Silver and brass candleholder for processional torch by Kaminer Haislip
with black walnut stem by Moran Woodworked Furniture
Hand Engraving by Kristina McClure
Photography by Jack Alterman

The black walnut too has special meaning and contributed immensely to this incredibly well thought out and meaningful project. Michael and Celia wrote:

“These pieces of Black Walnut came from one specific tree blown down by a storm on a friend’s cattle farm in Central Kentucky, close to where Michael grew up. We worked closely with Jim (the farmer) and his wife Deb to save as much of this tree and a handful of others trees befallen by similar circumstances. We spent seven days at the farm cutting/moving/milling trees into logs and then into boards. Next, we stacked all of the wood to dry for a year in a nearby barn then transferred to a kiln to finish drying. Each step of this long process we put our hands on every board, with care and concern for its well being and future. To date we’ve built many pieces from these trees that have found themselves all over the US, in homes, places of work, and now a place of worship.”

brass, silver, and black walnut base for processional torch
Brass and silver foot for processional torch by Kaminer Haislip
with black walnut base by Moran Woodworked Furniture
Photography by Jack Alterman

The base for each torch was created in brass, silver, and black walnut to harmonize with the torch design through the repetition of material and form. The hammering, raising, and forming of the heavy 10″ diameter brass dome was a physical and technical challenge for Kaminer, because brass is much harder than silver and not conducive to raising. She applied her traditional silversmithing training to it and was able to make not one, but two that are identical in shape and size. Her arms were ringing for days after the final planishing!

St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church Aiken SC historic sanctuary processional torches
Processional torches at St. Thaddeus Episcopal Church in Aiken, SC

The numerous right angles in all components of the torches was also a very difficult technical challenge. Each part when put together has to fit and stand up at a perfect right angle and they had to be the exact same height for the dishes to match up, so attention to detail was of the upmost importance. The candleholder, stem, and base components all come apart for easy cleaning, polishing, and future repair if needed. Kaminer, Michael, and Celia thought through carefully how all the elements would work together not only aesthetically, but also technically.

The end result is not only stunning visually, but includes symbolic significance to commemorate and celebrate the life of an incredible individual, Bishop Daly Pope Garnett, in a church he loved dearly.

Bishop Daly Pope Garnett
Bishop Daly Pope Garnett with his wife Katie,
daughter Graceyn, and son Thaddeus

Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018 – The Netherlands Silver Museum

netherlands silver museum

schoonhoven silver award 2018

Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018 – The Netherlands Silver Museum

Kaminer Haislip’s silver vessel Gradual Erosion was accepted into the international silver object (no jewelry) exhibition Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018!

The exhibition is hosted by The Netherlands Silver Museum in Schoonhoven and opened December 7, 2018. Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018 will be on display for three months before traveling to cities in Belgium and Germany until November 2019.

etched silver vessel

Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018 includes a wide variety of silversmiths from all over the world and its goal was to inspire artists to test and explore the boundaries of their traditional art and craft. The Netherlands Silver Museum sought objects that bear a direct relationship with the museum’s policy of stimulating the exploration of new technologies and uses, and innovative art forms. Innovation, as envisioned in the Award’s present edition, centers on the rejuvenation of past, time-honored techniques and on the preservation of this heritage through injecting dynamic new life into the art of silversmithing.

silver vase

The international Schoohnoven Silver Award exhibition began in 2001 and 2018 is the seventh edition of this unique silversmithing focused exhibition. Kaminer Haislip’s silver and ebony teapot Perched Flight was included in the 2009 exhibition Poetry in Silver, so she is excited and honored to exhibit again with her new silver vessel Gradual Erosion.

etched silver vessel

Gradual Erosion is currently available for sale, but will not be available for delivery until after the exhibition travels to two other European countries and ends in November 2019. Gradual Erosion will be returned to Kaminer Haislip after the exhibition and you can contact her directly for details at kaminer@kaminerhaislip.com.

To learn more about Gradual Erosion, visit its product page on this website’s Shop at https://www.kaminerhaislip.com/silver-art-jewelry-baby/gradual-erosion-silver/

To learn more about The Netherlands Silver Museum or Schoonhoven Silver Award 2018 visit the two links below.

https://zilvermuseum.com/en/

https://zilvermuseum.com/en/4919-2/

Night of 1000 Lights – December 2018

Night of 1000 Lights

Night of 1000 Lights – Downtown Aiken, SC

Kaminer Haislip is participating in the annual Night of 1000 Lights in historic downtown Aiken, SC on Thursday, December 6 from 6-8pm. Sponsoring businesses will stay open late, thousands of gorgeous luminaries will line the streets of downtown Aiken, and there will be wide variety of fun holiday activities taking place. This exciting event, organized by the Aiken Downtown Development Association, is a tradition not to be missed!

True Value Aiken SC

During the event, Kaminer’s handcrafted silver jewelry, functional objects, and Christmas ornaments will be displayed for sale at her family’s business, True Value Hardware & Appliance, located at 121 Laurens Street.  Stop by True Value to see her work and enjoy some holiday cheer!

aiken

http://www.visitaikensc.com/whattodo/detail/aiken_downtown_development_association_adda

http://www.downtownaiken.com/

Helena Fox Fine Art – Charleston, SC

helena fox fine art

silver oyster bracelet

 

Helena Fox Fine Art – Makers Market

Kaminer Haislip’s silver jewelry, functional objects, and Christmas ornaments will be exhibited for sale at Helena Fox Fine Art for their first Makers Market Friday, November 30 and Saturday, December 1 from 11am-4pm. Shop this special gallery event for unique, handmade holiday gifts!

Located South of Broad in historic, downtown Charleston, SC, Helena Fox Fine Art specializes in fine American representational art featuring artists from around the country.

106-A Church Street
Charleston, SC 29401

www.helenafoxfineart.com

Equestrian Themed Christmas Ornament Collection for Holiday 2018

equestrian christmas ornaments

 

Equestrian Themed Christmas Ornament Collection for Holiday 2018

New for Holiday 2018 Kaminer Haislip has designed and created an equestrian themed Christmas Ornament collection! All in sterling silver, Horse, Equestrian Helmet, and Lucky Horseshoe are the perfect Christmas gift for an equestrian enthusiast or someone who loves horses. Horse and Equestrian Helmet can be personalized with gorgeous hand engraving. Lucky Horseshoe has a hammered surface that will sparkle on the Christmas tree and catch the light beautifully!

Shop the collection on Kaminer’s website store under the Holiday category.

Kaminer’s inspiration for this special equestrian collection came from her wonderful experience at the World Equestrian Games in Tryon, NC this fall. She met so many great people and already had so many friends involved in the equestrian world she wanted to design something fun for them. Also, growing up in Aiken, SC, a small equestrian community, and spending time on her grandparents’ farm with their horses in northern Virginia, had an influence on this unique collection. Kaminer has always loved horses and hope you will like these ornaments as much as she does!

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