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Find Joy in Art Auction – May 26-30, 2020

find joy in art auction sc arts foundation

Find Joy in Art Auction – May 26-30, 2020

“Find Joy in Art” is an online art auction organized by the South Carolina Arts Foundation in order to help support SC artists. The amazing array of artwork by some of SC’s most accomplished and established artists represents the wide variety of media employed by our local contemporary creatives. Art items up for bid include elegant pieces of jewelry, masterful paintings, compelling photographs, functional and decorative ceramic or glass objects, beautiful textiles, virtuoso hand-pulled prints and well-designed and built furniture.

For more details on the auction, how to bid, the participating artists and their artwork, visit https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/foundation/find-joy-in-art-auction/

I was honored by the invitation to participate in this exciting benefit initiative alongside so many amazing contemporary, SC artists I greatly admire! Many are longtime friends and colleagues I am thrilled to collaborate in partnership with the SC Arts Foundation to assist local artists. A carefully curated selection of my silver jewelry and functional home objects will be available in the auction. Be sure to register at the link above in order to view my work and the other incredible artwork featured in this charitable event. Most importantly, bid on artwork to help support SC artists!

SC artists have reported due to the coronavirus pandemic, 95% have experienced loss, 66% have experienced unanticipated expenditures, and 63% have become fully unemployed. Cancelled events, exhibitions, markets, performances, concerts, festivals, openings, and many more arts related functions that generate revenue and a livelihood for artists have contributed to this astonishing loss. Creativity is at the heart of our culture and without it, there is certainly less joy in our beloved state, cities, towns, and communities. For that reason and many more it is so important to support this art auction and SC artists.

“Find Joy in Art” is coordinated by the SC Arts Foundation, a nonprofit organization established in 1972 dedicated to recognizing, encouraging and supporting the art and artists of South Carolina. Throughout its history, the Foundation has pursued creative ways to help the business community and private citizens contribute to a thriving arts community across the state. Learn more about this incredible arts organization at https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/foundation/

Daughters of the American Revolution – American Heritage Award

Daughters of the American Revolution DAR
Daughters of the American Revolution DAR American Heritage Award

Daughters of the American Revolution – American Heritage Award

I am so incredibly proud to announce I have been honored by the Daughters of the American Revolution two prestigious awards for the annual American Heritage Competition. My collection of handcrafted silver boxes Chorus was awarded the American Heritage Award for Crafts, First Place in the Other category!

chorus silver boxes craft award american heritage award
Silver Chorus boxes by Kaminer Haislip

The theme this year was “Rise, and Shine Your Light on the 19th Amendment” in celebration of the one hundred year anniversary of the women’s right to vote law being passed. The three birds symbolize a group of women together lifting up their voices and being heard, which directly relates to the suffrage movement. Just as women stood together and bravely fought for the right to vote, these birds collectively as a choir are rising up, harmonizing as one, and vocalizing their strength and determination. They are unified in their efforts, just like the women who courageously struggled for women’s right to vote and ultimately prevailed.

handcrafted silver box hollowware bird box women's suffrage
Silver Chorus boxes by Kaminer Haislip

The second American Heritage Award I received was for the same entry and it is The Evelyn Cole Peters Award, which is awarded for excellence in any of the contest categories when an exceptional entry is presented. It is not given out every year, so it is a special honor. I was shocked by the first award, but the second award really floored me! It is such an honor and privilege to receive both of these prominent awards for my artwork.

dar american heritage competition silver boxes
Detail of silver Chorus boxes by Kaminer Haislip

I will receive the awards formally at DAR Continental Congress in June and I am so excited to highlight my wonderful Charleston DAR Rebecca Motte Chapter during this special event! Rebecca Motte’s father Robert Brewton and grandfather Miles Brewton were two of the most accomplished and talented silversmiths of colonial Charleston. Hopefully I am representing our chapter namesake well!

Through both this award and my involvement in DAR, an exceptional national non-profit organization and genealogical society, I strive to honor my American Revolution patriot and family heritage. For more information on DAR and our dedication to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America’s future through better education for children please visit http://www.dar.org/.

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

garden & gun charleston sc anniversary issue arts in charleston

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

The Arts in Charleston Then and Now by Sandy Lang

…take a casual art walk to collector-worthy galleries within steps of one another. The George Gallery houses work from a number of modern artists, including the abstract expressionist William Halsey, the Halsey Institute’s namesake and a pioneer in the Southeast, while at Helena Fox Fine Art, you can take in Savannah native West Fraser’s panoramic Lowcountry landscapes and the oyster-shaped links of necklaces by Charleston silversmith Kaminer Haislip. A few doors down sits Dog & Horse Fine Art, where gallery owner Jaynie Milligan Spector curates (not surprisingly) an array of canine- and equine-themed work. You can even commission a portrait miniature of a beloved spaniel or pointer, in a style reminiscent of those centuries-old human portraits at the Gibbes, to be incorporated into a pendant or a bracelet….

To read the full Garden & Gun article featuring all the best of the arts in Charleston visit https://gardenandgun.com/articles/the-arts-in-charleston-then-and-now/?fbclid=IwAR1MoUGL3z-z-f6kuhk-gMx1IvZz_462zT6pVDit5097iz8AoxYYvwHaDs0

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

post and courier newspaper charleston sc

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

Need inspiration for holiday gifts? Leave it to the pros: Charleston artists

By Maura Hogan

December 7, 2019

Artistic metal

Silversmith Kaminer Haislip’s jewelry also reflects beautifully on Lowcountry culture. Her artful, modern lines lend a new, fluid twist to Charleston’s favorite bivalve, by way of her sterling silver Oyster Series. From single-shell earrings to luxe linked bracelets, from lustrous cuff links to dreamy dishes, the works join the organic and the minimal to stunning, silvery effect. Prices vary. For more information, visit kaminerhaislip.com

To read the entire holiday gift guide article visit https://www.postandcourier.com/columnists/need-inspiration-for-holiday-gifts-leave-it-to-the-pros/article_6203da7c-16aa-11ea-8dcf-07058c2e613e.html

To shop Kaminer Haislip’s entire silver Oyster Series collection visit https://www.kaminerhaislip.com/store/

Charleston Artwalk + Trunk Show – Helena Fox Fine Art

helena fox fine art
helena fox fine art gallery charleston artwalk

Charleston Artwalk + Trunk Show

Helena Fox Fine Art, who represents my handcrafted silver designs in their stunning downtown Charleston art gallery, is featuring my work and the paintings of artist Julyan Davis for the Charleston Artwalk Friday, November 1 from 5-8pm. You can read the full press release for our exhibition Classically Contemporary on my website Press page.

Helena Fox Fine Art regularly carries a curated selection of my silver hollowware, flatware, home objects, and jewelry. During the artwalk and on Saturday, November 2 from 11am-4pm, a wider selection of my silver home objects and jewelry will be shown, including my new Oyster Jewelry collection. I hope to see you at one of those events!

Helena Fox Fine Art

106A Church Street

Charleston, SC 29401

843-723-0073

www.helenafoxfineart.com

Classically Contemporary – Helena Fox Fine Art – November 1, 2019

helena fox fine art
helena fox fine art gallery historic charleston sc classically contemporary
Silver Oyster Jewelry by Kaminer Haislip

Classically Contemporary—Where classic techniques and contemporary ideals meet

CHARLESTON, S.C. November 1, 2019—Helena Fox Fine Art is pleased to announce Classically Contemporary featuring artist Julyan Davis and silversmith Kaminer Haislip.

Opening reception during the First Friday Artwalk on November 1 from 5-8pm.

At the intersection of classic techniques and contemporary ideals we find artists Julyan Davis and Kaminer Haislip. Trained in centuries old techniques these two artist draw from their traditional art educations to create pieces which feel both classic and contemporary. From Julyan’s John Constable like paintings of the clouds over the Southern coast to Kaminer’s Georg Jensen like interpretation of the familiar oyster shell, these artists live and breath the history of their chosen mediums.

In his own words, Julyan Davis paints ‘for storytellers—novelists, songwriters, poets. I also paint for those who love history. There has always been a narrative thread in my work. Even when a scene was notably empty of incident, I have strived for a sense that something vital happened here, or that something will.’ The new body of work he will present for our November show continues his movement from strict plein air interpretation towards a more cerebral interpretations—a continuation of the stories told and re-told.

A true master silversmith, Kaminer Haislip studied her craft under internationally acclaimed English silversmith Alfred Ward. She knows historic and modern silver techniques and uses that knowledge to meld form and function into enchanting coffee pots which look as thought they could take flight at any moment or a functional yet funky appetizer fork—or as my momma would have called it a pickle fork. Her work is not only meant to be admired for its shape and beauty but it’s usefulness. For this show we will be highlighting her home collection as well as the oyster collection.

Join us Friday November 1, 2019 between 5-8pm to meet the artists and admire their new work.

Helena Fox Fine Art

106A Church Street

Charleston, SC 29401

843-723-0073

www.helenafoxfineart.com

Handcrafted Silver Spoons

Kaminer Haislip’s silver Flight of Fancy Serving Spoon

Handcrafted Silver Spoons

Serving up silver spoons for this Blog post! Since silversmithing has become an obscure craft, I have decided to write a series of posts that feature various traditional silversmithing processes I use to create my silver designs. As often as I am asked how I make my pieces, I have come to realize how little most people know about silversmithing. I took my first jewelry and silversmithing course over twenty years ago, so it has become extremely normal to me since I have done it practically every day since then!

The majority of the time, people only see my finished works and not the process, so they have no idea the amount of time, labor and skill that goes into making them. Through sharing some of my silversmithing techniques, I hope to give some insight into what it takes to craft my functional works of art.

silversmithing hammers jewelry hammers silversmith workshop jewelry studio
A selection of Kaminer Haislip’s silversmithing and jewelry hammers.

My journey to becoming a silversmith began long before my first college course and you can read about my background in detail on a former Blog post titled “How did you get into silversmithing?”. During my BFA studies at Winthrop University under Alfred Ward, an internationally acclaimed English silversmith, the first functional object I made was a silver spoon with laminated ebony handle. The spoon form has much significance to my functional work and I have continued to explore it since that first creation so many years ago. To view a selection of spoons I have made over the course of my career and the aforementioned first spoon visit my website Portfolio Spoons page.

silversmithing tools silversmith stakes metalsmithing workshop steel stake
Several of Kaminer’s steel silversmithing stakes

As covered in my previous Blog post on my forged silver cheese knife, all of my objects begin as sterling silver sheet and wire. For hollowing and forming silver sheet into functional objects, I hammer it over steel stakes that are the precise curve I need for an item, such as a silver spoon. The stake is held in a sturdy steel vise as shown below.

spoon stake silver spoon silversmithing technique handcrafted silver spoon
Spoon stake in vise

I use a rawhide mallet to form the spoon bowl, because it does not stretch the silver or leave marks in the surface.

traditional silversmithing technique handcrafting a silver spoon silversmith studio
Silver spoon bowl being formed over steel stake
sterling silver spoon charleston rice spoon serving spoon

Once the spoon bowl shape is formed, I planish it with a steel hammer to set the form precisely and work harden the metal, so it has strength when used to serve food.

Kaminer Haislip Charleston silversmith contemporary silver functional art
Silversmith Kaminer Haislip planishing the silver spoon bowl.

With the planishing technique I use small, light overlapping blows as shown up close below.

silver spoon bowl planish silversmith hammer silversmithing technique
Overlapping planishing hammer marks on the silver surface

The planishing process is one of my favorite silversmithing techniques! It requires focus, rhythm, and precision to hammer around and around consistently over the entire surface. I really enjoy planishing my silver spoons, but a coffeepot or teapot is an extensive challenge that I so revel in!

The two spoons highlighted in this Blog post are from my Flight of Fancy Series in which the handle design was inspired by the shape of a bird’s wing. The serving spoon (first image) has a traditional serving spoon length handle, but the Charleston Rice Spoon has a longer handle. The silver Charleston Rice Spoon, derived from the English Stuffing Spoon, historically had a long handle. During the 18th and 19th centuries rice was an immensely important crop to Charleston’s economy and the rice spoon was created due to it. My contemporary design is based on the historic form and gives a nod to tradition while still looking forward.

Both spoon styles are very popular wedding gifts, so be sure to check them out in my website Shop Home category. A handcrafted silver spoon certainly serves a purpose when stylishly entertaining!

Private Trunk Show

private trunk show kiawah island sc
Kaminer Haislip’s silver jewelry and home objects displayed at a Kiawah Island residence

Private Trunk Show

Recently for several exclusive groups I have done a private trunk show, so I decided to highlight one I did last week at a Kiawah Island, SC residence on my website Blog. I was invited to display for sale my handcrafted silver jewelry and functional home objects in the stunning home featured in these pictures. It was the perfect clean, contemporary setting for my silver pieces!

functional home objects contemporary silver trunk show
Kaminer Haislip’s silver functional home objects displayed in the kitchen of the Kiawah Island home

The group who invited me to do the unique presentation asked me to set up my silver designs throughout the gorgeous dining, living, and kitchen spaces. They loved seeing my jewelry and functional objects in this elegant home setting and my design aesthetic harmonized wonderfully with it.

private trunk show kiawah island house

The guests were able to peruse my work, discuss it and my handcrafted process with me during the event. As I do with most of my lectures, I brought a selection of my tools and silver works in progress to illustrate how I create my pieces from silver sheet and wire. The majority of the time, people only see the end product, so by incorporating the tools and in process pieces, I add an educational component to my presentations. They very much enjoyed seeing the works in progress along side the finished items!

handcrafted silver jewelry display trunk show

The home overlooks a gorgeous lagoon you can see from the expansive window views, open floor plan, and porches. The immense amount of light coming in through the numerous windows created a lovely illumination over my display and made my silver pieces really sparkle!

hammered silver jewelry silver bangle bracelet silver pendant silver necklace silver box
silver jewelry silver vase silver baby cup baby spoon hammered silver bowl silver cufflinks

I very much enjoy sharing my silversmithing work and doing a private trunk show. I welcome inquiries on how to bring my silver presentation to your special group, so please feel free to email me at kaminer@kaminerhaislip.com for details and fees. Thank you for your interest in my work!

Forged Silver Cheese Knife

Silver cheese knife silver tray cheese plate appetizer serving accessories charcuterie plate

Forged Silver Cheese Knife

I am constantly asked how I make my silver pieces, so I am highlighting some of my processes on my website Blog to give insight into my handcrafted techniques. All of my designs are created with sterling silver sheet and wire through skilled fabrication techniques. Each object is made individually by my hands and I do not use casting or other mass manufacturing processes. For this blog post, my forged silver cheese knife illustrates one way I use forging in my silversmithing work.

Kaminer Haislip silversmith forged silver cheese knife silversmithing studio

Forging is a traditional metalsmithing technique that moves the metal by hammering the surface, and I mainly use this on flatware and utensils, because it gives the silver immense strength. Using a heavy hammer, forging stretches the metal and creates tension and toughness at the molecular level. Durability is of the upmost importance for functional objects and silver gains enough strength to hold its form precisely when work-hardened. Additionally, silver’s natural antiseptic properties make it the ideal medium for flatware and serving utensils.

silversmith workshop forging technique hammered silver

I begin my cheese knife by forging the shape from thick, solid sterling silver sheet. The blank begins smaller than the final form because it enlarges and expands during the hammering process on the dense steel block.

silver forging silversmith workshop handmade silver utensil

Next, I work the blade with a large planishing hammer to smooth the deep forging marks out of it and further refine the shape.

hammered silver cheese knife silversmith process handcrafted flatware

The hammer marks are then removed and the blade edge is honed razor sharp so that it will slice easily and work effectively. Finally, the entire knife is brought to a high shine on the polishing machine.

Polishing is another highly skilled process I will discuss in a future Blog post, so stay tuned.

silver cheese serving knife dining accessory silver flatware

My silver spreader is made the same way, so check out that piece in my website Shop as well!

silver spreader appetizer serving utensil handcrafted flatware pimento cheese server

For more information on how I handcraft my designs, visit the Handcrafted Process page on my website. Thank you for your interest in my silversmithing work!

Charleston Silver Lecture

American College of the Building Arts silver lecture
Brandy Culp at the American College of the Building Arts
American College of the Building Arts silver lecture
Kaminer Haislip at the American College of the Building Arts

Charleston Silver Lecture by Brandy Culp and Kaminer Haislip

Brandy Culp, the Richard Koopman Curator of American Decorative Arts at the Wadsworth Atheneum, and I have recently given several lecture presentations on Charleston silver, so I was inspired to write a blog post discussing our unique collaboration. We have presented to private organizations and groups and last week we gave a lecture on Charleston silver for the American College of the Building Arts. The pictures in this post are from that event.

Kaminer Haislip and Brandy Culp at their Charleston silver lecture
Kaminer Haislip and Brandy Culp at their Charleston silver lecture

When Brandy and I collaborate on a Charleston silver lecture, we begin with her discussing colonial Charleston history and silversmithing. She is an expert in the decorative arts field and in particular metalwork. Brandy earned her Master of Arts degree with an emphasis in American decorative arts from the Bard Graduate Center. There she completed her thesis on the 18th century Charleston silversmith Alexander Petrie and the Carolina silver trade. The topic of metalwork remains one of her greatest interests, and she is currently working on a permanent exhibition of the Wadsworth’s English and American silver collections.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Lecture attendees looking at Kaminer Haislip’s silversmithing tools, silver objects in progress, and finished silver items

Brandy ties my contemporary silversmithing brilliantly to historic forms and processes. I discuss in detail how I design and create my original, silver designs and use tools and in progress silver items to illustrate the relationship between my silversmithing techniques and past silversmith practices. Additionally, I bring a selection of finished silver hollowware, flatware, and jewelry for attendees to see in person during the lecture and up close after our slide presentation is over.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Brandy Culp with lecture guests

We always save time for a question and answer session at the end of our lecture and spend time with guests after the event to take additional questions and socialize.

American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
John Paul Huguley and Kaminer Haislip after the lecture
American College of the Building Arts Charleston silver lecture
Brandy Culp with guests after the lecture

Brandy and I both are incredibly passionate about silver and very much enjoy sharing our silver knowledge. The combination of her historic metalwork expertise and my contemporary silver designs has been extremely well received each time we have done a presentation. If you are interested in having us speak to your group, organization, or college, then please email me at kaminer@kaminerhaislip.com. I can provide details, fees, and press material.

Thank you for your interest in silver!

Portfolio Items