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Quail Forever Benefit Event – November 22, 2021

quail forever

Quail Forever Benefit Event – Monday, November 22, 2021

I am very excited to participate in this Lowcountry holiday market and benefit event for Quail Forever co-hosted by the Charleston Mercury! I will have my silver jewelry, functional home objects, and Christmas ornaments displayed for sale.

The event will be held Monday, November 22 at the Boone Hall Cotton Dock in Mt. Pleasant, SC from 4-9pm and the details are above. I hope to see you at this festive, Southern event!

Save the Date!

Save the Date for Holiday Trunk Shows!

trunk show

This fall and holiday season I have a great line up of trunk shows scheduled, so please save the date! Below are the events I have scheduled so far and more details will be posted on my website Blog closer to the dates.

Helena Fox Fine Art – Charleston, SC – Friday, November 5 and Saturday, November 6

Mistletoe & Merlot – Aiken, SC – Thursday, November 18 from 6pm-9pm and Friday, November 19 from 9am-5pm

Silver Showing with The Charleston Silver Lady – Lexington, SC – Wednesday, December 8

 

New Gorget Jewelry Series

New Gorget Jewelry Series

gorget pendant

Gorget Pendant Large

For the Daughters of the American Revolution American Heritage Competition “Rise, and Shine Your Light on Your Revolutionary War Patriot”, I designed and created a silver necklace based on my great-great-great-great-great grandfather Captain Joshua Hadley’s military service during the Revolutionary War. The design process required a lot of research and thought, which I thoroughly enjoyed and learned a lot from. To my great surprise and esteemed honor, it was awarded First Place in the Jewelry category and later received a South Carolina House of Representatives House Resolution. Details about both can be read on this Blog page. The necklace garnered such a positive response that I decided to do a spin off jewelry series based on one of the necklace elements, the Gorget.

The Gorget traces its history back to medieval times when it was worn as a piece of armor around the neck to protect the throat. Over time the shape, size, and function changed and by the 17th century it became a symbol of rank among military officers of many countries. At this point it was suspended around the neck with a chain or ribbon and was purely decorative.

silver gorget pendant

Gorget Pendant Small

The white crescent shape on the South Carolina flag is thought to be partly inspired by the Gorget. The original flag flown during the American Revolution Battle of Sullivan’s Island in Charleston, SC on June 28, 1776 had a blue background with the white crescent in the upper left hand corner. The flag played a prominent role in the battle that day and the Americans successfully defeated the British, which was a turning point in the war and led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence.

My contemporary interpretation of this historic form was inspired by its prominence during the American Revolutionary War in which my great-great-great-great-great grandfather Captain Joshua Hadley was a Continental Army officer. He participated in many important battles throughout the American Revolution, including the Battle of Sullivan’s Island. I feel the Gorget is my way of honoring that important event in American history and my ancestor. It also speaks to the place in which I live and Charleston’s important role in the early days of the American republic.

gorget earrings

Gorget Earrings

This new jewelry collection includes two pendants and one pair of post style earrings. Shop the new series and my other silver jewelry designs in my website store Jewelry category.

Daughters of the American Revolution – American Heritage Award

dar dar

Daughters of the American Revolution – American Heritage Award

captain joshua hadley

Captain Joshua Hadley silver necklace by Kaminer Haislip

I am so incredibly proud to announce I have been honored by the Daughters of the American Revolution with a prestigious award for the annual American Heritage Competition. My sterling silver necklace Captain Joshua Hadley was awarded the American Heritage Award for Crafts, First Place in the Jewelry category! It is such an honor and privilege to receive this prominent award for my artwork. The theme this year was Rise, and Shine Your Light on Your Revolutionary War Patriot and Captain Joshua Hadley is my great-great-great-great-great grandfather and DAR Patriot.  

american revolution
Captain Joshua Hadley silver necklace by Kaminer Haislip

Captain Joshua Hadley served in the 1st North Carolina Regiment, Continental Army from 1775 until 1787. My design for this necklace was informed by detailed research I did on his service in the Revolutionary War. The five units comprising the necklace were hand pierced from sterling silver sheet and formed utilizing traditional silversmithing techniques. Each charm has a specific meaning and they are outlined below.

Captains wore an epaulette on their right shoulder to signify rank, so when worn that charm is the upper right side. Captains also wore a white cockade on their hat to identify their status, so the radiating circular shape is my interpretation of the ribbon rosette. The surface designs on the epaulette and cockade were hand drawn onto the silver sheet and then etched with an acid technique to create the textured lines.

The center form is a Gorget, which traces its history back to medieval times when it was worn as a piece of armor around the neck to protect the throat. Over time the shape, size, and function changed and by the 17th century it became a symbol of rank among military officers of many countries. At this point it was suspended around the neck with a chain or ribbon and was purely decorative. Additionally, the white crescent shape on the blue South Carolina flag is thought to be partly inspired by the Gorget shape. Captain Joshua Hadley fought in the Battle of Sullivan’s Island in Charleston, SC on June 28, 1776. The flag played a prominent role in the battle that day and the Americans successfully defeated the British, which was a turning point in the war and led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. Therefore, the Gorget also represents Charleston in this piece and where I live. On the back of the Gorget is hand engraved “Captain Joshua Hadley”.

gorget

Back of Gorget charm on necklace hand engraved 

Joshua Hadley was an Original Member of the Society of the Cincinnati and an eagle is their insignia. The fourth charm represents his membership in the oldest patriotic organization in the United States. I used the Society of the Cincinnati eagle that is on his graver marker as inspiration for the design, which was etched with the same technique as described above. 

society of the cincinnati eagle

Captain Joshua Hadley’s grave in Tennessee

The final charm is in the shape of North Carolina, which represents his home state during the war and his Regiment. On June 20, 1775 he joined other patriots to form an association of the Sons of Liberty at Liberty Point in what is now Fayetteville, NC. The document they signed that evening contained the statement “We stand ready to sacrifice our lives to secure her freedom”. A granite memorial later erected at the site to commemorate the event includes their names and that statement. Hand engraved on the front of the state is that phrase and the date is on the back.            

north carolina charm

Front of North Carolina silver charm with hand engraving

north carolina silver necklace

Back of North Carolina silver charm with hand engraving

liberty point north carolina

Liberty Point in historic, downtown Fayetteville, North Carolina

revolutionary war monument

Monument at Liberty Point in historic, downtown Fayetteville, North Carolina

american revolution monument

Captain Joshua Hadley’s name on the monument

The theme of this year’s competition, Rise, and Shine Your Light on Your Revolutionary War Patriot, motivated me to dig deeper into my great-great-great-great-great grandfather’s military service in order to create an artwork representative of his patriotism. I thoroughly enjoyed the journey and learning experience, which broadened my knowledge of the war and put my artwork on a new path. The United States of America has an extraordinary history that should be studied, celebrated, honored, protected, and passed on to future generations proudly. Hopefully through this silver necklace Captain Joshua Hadley’s contribution to the American Revolution as well as that part of our great country’s history shines.

I will receive the award formally at DAR Continental Congress in June and I am so excited to highlight my wonderful Charleston DAR Rebecca Motte Chapter during this special event! Rebecca Motte’s father Robert Brewton and grandfather Miles Brewton were two of the most accomplished and talented silversmiths of colonial Charleston. Hopefully I am representing our chapter namesake well!

Through both this award and my involvement in DAR, an exceptional national non-profit organization and genealogical society, I strive to honor my American Revolution patriot and family heritage. For more information on DAR and our dedication to promoting patriotism, preserving American history, and securing America’s future through better education for children please visit http://www.dar.org/.

“How did you get into silversmithing?”

“How did you get into silversmithing?” is one of the most frequently asked questions I receive.

I discuss it briefly in my Bio posted on my website, but I get the same question so often I decided to share more of my story on my Blog.

 

silversmithing studio

Kaminer Haislip working in her silversmithing studio

 

Aiken, South Carolina, which received Southern Living’s 2018 award for The South’s Best Small Town, is my hometown. I grew up in my family’s business True Value Hardware & Appliance, which is located on the main street of Aiken’s historic downtown. My grandfather Bill Franklin started the hardware store as a side project when he was an accountant at Savannah River Site. When my parents Det and Lyanne Haislip were married, my father took over the business.

 

True Value Aiken SC

True Value Hardware & Appliance in historic downtown Aiken, SC

 

As children, my brother Wylie, cousins Anne and Franklin, and I spent a lot of time there, especially at Christmas. As you can see in the picture below, we had so much fun with the toys, go carts, and window displays!

 

hardware store 1980's

Kaminer with her brother and cousins in the hardware store as children in the 1980’s

 

In high school, I worked in the hardware store and that is when my interest began in making sculpture and jewelry. Being around all of the tools and equipment, putting together bikes and toys, and cutting keys is now an obvious connection to how working with my hands became my career.

 

True Value Aiken SC

True Value newspaper feature from 1990’s

 

When I was in high school, I took the industrial tech class, because I wanted to learn how to make sculptures in metal and wood. Being the only girl in the class did not bother me at all and I took to learning welding and wood working immediately. One of my first wood sculptures is shown below. Displayed in a downtown Aiken park not far from my family’s business, it was my first artwork exhibited outside of a school setting.

 

sculpture

Sculpture from high school in 1990’s

 

I knew by then I wanted to be a professional artist and major in jewelry and sculpture in college, so I sought out a college with a strong jewelry and sculpture program. After careful deliberation, I decided the small liberal arts college Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC would be the best fit for me. Alfred Ward, an English silversmith from London, was head of the jewelry and metals program and I was excited to study under such a renowned silversmith.

 

silver ebony wood spoon

Silver and ebony wood spoon from undergraduate studies

 

The first functional silver object I made studying under Alf was the silver spoon with ebony wood handle shown above. This piece is significant to my work, because it was the first time I laminated silver and wood. I continue to use this method of fabrication for spoon, teapot and coffeepot handles, because it creates strength in the handle and a beautiful line of silver down the center.

 

art gallery

Kaminer and her brother Wylie at her first gallery exhibition

 

From there I was hooked on silversmithing, because it combined my interest in jewelry techniques and sculptural forms. My graduation exhibition with my classmates in Charlotte, NC was my first commercial art gallery exhibit. Pictured above is me with my brother Wylie looking at one of my display cases at the opening reception. After graduating with my BFA in Jewelry and Metals, I moved to Charlotte and started my MFA silversmithing studies under Alf at Winthrop.

 

Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University

Kaminer and her professor Alf at Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University in London, England

 

While in graduate school, I focused on silversmithing and immersed myself in it completely. During that time, I also taught the Jewelry II and III classes and jewelry workshops at Winthrop. Additionally, I interned and was a docent at the Mint Museum, where I learned up close the history of craft and design and how a professional institution operates. During the summer of 2004, I went to London for a family trip and my MFA thesis research. Alf and his wife were in England visiting family, so he was kind enough to meet us in London and show us around. Pictured above is me with Alf in the stake room of Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University, where Alf was formerly head of the silversmithing and jewelry department.

 

silver teapot

Perched Flight silver and ebony wood teapot

 

In 2005 I graduated with my MFA in Silversmithing and Design with a minor in Sculpture. The first teapot I made was Perched Flight and it is silver with an ebony wood handle that is laminated with silver in the center. It was the central piece to my MFA thesis exhibition and after was accepted to five national exhibitions and one international exhibition. I became very attached to it, so it is now in me and my husband’s collection.

Immediately following graduation, I moved to Charleston, South Carolina and established my studio and business. Three years later my husband Matt and I had our wedding reception at the William Aiken House. My hometown was named for William Aiken and he is my great-great-great-great uncle.

 

Charleston Weddings Magazine

Charleston Weddings Magazine feature – see full article on website Press page

 

My path to silversmithing began at a very young age, but it wasn’t until I started my business and began exhibiting my work nationally that people started asking me “How did you get into silversmithing?”. When I thought about it and shared my story, I realized how unusual it is for a girl to grow up in a small southern town hardware store and become a contemporary silversmith. Really?!

For less lengthy answers to frequently asked questions, visit my FAQ page on my website!

 

Helena Fox Fine Art Gallery – November 2020

helena fox fine art helena fox fine art gallery

Helena Fox Fine Art – Charleston, SC

Helena Fox Fine Art, who represents my handcrafted silver designs and regularly carries a curated selection of my silver hollowware, flatware, home objects, and jewelry in their stunning downtown Charleston art gallery, is hosting a special Open House event featuring my artwork Friday, November 13 and Saturday, November 14 from 12-4pm. During that time the gallery will be open to the public and there is the option for a private viewing. Please contact the gallery to set up individual appointments.

You can read the full press release about the event on my website Press page.

I will exhibit a wider variety of my silver objects, original jewelry designs, and Christmas ornaments than what the gallery usually shows during this unique event. I hope to see you there!

Helena Fox Fine Art

106A Church Street

Charleston, SC 29401

843-723-0073

www.helenafoxfineart.com

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

garden & gun charleston sc anniversary issue arts in charleston

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

The Arts in Charleston Then and Now by Sandy Lang

…take a casual art walk to collector-worthy galleries within steps of one another. The George Gallery houses work from a number of modern artists, including the abstract expressionist William Halsey, the Halsey Institute’s namesake and a pioneer in the Southeast, while at Helena Fox Fine Art, you can take in Savannah native West Fraser’s panoramic Lowcountry landscapes and the oyster-shaped links of necklaces by Charleston silversmith Kaminer Haislip. A few doors down sits Dog & Horse Fine Art, where gallery owner Jaynie Milligan Spector curates (not surprisingly) an array of canine- and equine-themed work. You can even commission a portrait miniature of a beloved spaniel or pointer, in a style reminiscent of those centuries-old human portraits at the Gibbes, to be incorporated into a pendant or a bracelet….

To read the full Garden & Gun article featuring all the best of the arts in Charleston visit https://gardenandgun.com/articles/the-arts-in-charleston-then-and-now/?fbclid=IwAR1MoUGL3z-z-f6kuhk-gMx1IvZz_462zT6pVDit5097iz8AoxYYvwHaDs0

PechaKucha 36 – Charleston, SC – February 2020

PechaKucha 36 Charleston, SC Charleston Music Hall rapid fire presentation artist lecture
PechaKucha 36 poster design by Josh Capeder

PechaKucha 36 – Charleston Music Hall – 02/20/2020

PechaKucha, a series of rapid-fire presentations from an array of local creatives, will have its 36th show in Charleston on Thursday, February 20 in celebration of the first International PechaKucha Night alongside 1200 other cities. Each presenter will have approximately six minutes and forty seconds to discuss 20 specific images related to their profession for 20 seconds each. Emceed by musician and record producer Wolfgang Zimmerman, this lecture series will feature head chef/co-owner of Spanish taperia, Malagón Juan Cassalett; designer and silversmith Kaminer Haislip; actor, playwright, and educator Michael Smalwood; and more. 

The event will be held at Charleston Music Hall, located at 37 John Street in downtown Charleston. Doors open at 6pm and presentations begin at 7pm.

To purchase tickets or to see the full list of presenters and additional details, visit https://www.charlestonmusichall.com/event/pk-charleston-36/

PechaKucha 36 has received exciting press from both Charleston City Paper and Charleston Magazine, so it is an event you do not want to miss!

PechaKucha 36 poster design by Josh Capeder

Silversmithing Workshop at American College of the Building Arts

american college of the building arts charleston sc
american college of the building arts charleston sc silversmithing class
American College of the Building Arts
649 Meeting Street – Charleston, SC 29403

Silversmithing Workshop at American College of the Building Arts

American College of the Building Arts is hosting a week-long celebration with current women artisan and craftsmen that are masters in their fields. They will be conducting workshops, demonstrations, and a panel discussion. These courses are open to both students and the public.

As part of this special “Women in Trades Week”, Kaminer Haislip has been invited to teach a silversmithing workshop Monday, January 13 – Thursday, January 16. The class will focus on traditional silversmithing techniques with fabrication and forming as the main topics. Each student will make a round silver box like the shorter one below by Kaminer Haislip. The class description and details are below. Contact the American College of the Building Arts to sign up for this exciting workshop and rare chance to learn from Kaminer.

silver box fabricated silver silversmithing class birds singing chorus
Chorus – Silver
by Kaminer Haislip

Introduction to Silversmithing

January 13 – 16

Tuition: $550

Learn basic silversmithing techniques with this beginner’s class that does not require experience. The centuries old method of forming and fabricating sheet silver to create objects will be the focus of this week long course. Traditional silversmith hollowing, hammering, forming, and fabrication techniques will be taught in order to create a silver box. Additional beginner’s techniques will be explored through piercing, filing, soldering, and finishing.

Professor: Kaminer Haislip

Kaminer Haislip, originally from Aiken, SC, earned her BFA in Jewelry and Metals and MFA in Silversmithing from Winthrop University where she studied under Alfred Ward, an internationally acclaimed English silversmith. Kaminer designs and creates functional objects and jewelry in her Charleston studio. In addition to her work as an artist, she is frequently commissioned to create custom designs in silver and gold. Her award-winning work has been exhibited nationally and internationally and featured in over sixty publications.

For more information or to register for the class visit https://acba.edu/wintercourses

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

post and courier newspaper charleston sc

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

Need inspiration for holiday gifts? Leave it to the pros: Charleston artists

By Maura Hogan

December 7, 2019

Artistic metal

Silversmith Kaminer Haislip’s jewelry also reflects beautifully on Lowcountry culture. Her artful, modern lines lend a new, fluid twist to Charleston’s favorite bivalve, by way of her sterling silver Oyster Series. From single-shell earrings to luxe linked bracelets, from lustrous cuff links to dreamy dishes, the works join the organic and the minimal to stunning, silvery effect. Prices vary. For more information, visit kaminerhaislip.com

To read the entire holiday gift guide article visit https://www.postandcourier.com/columnists/need-inspiration-for-holiday-gifts-leave-it-to-the-pros/article_6203da7c-16aa-11ea-8dcf-07058c2e613e.html

To shop Kaminer Haislip’s entire silver Oyster Series collection visit https://www.kaminerhaislip.com/store/

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