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New South Finds – December 2021

new south finds

New South Finds – December 2021

New South Finds is an online magazine by Linda Jerkins, a longtime newspaper features writer who wrote a column called Southern Made for the Atlanta Journal Constitution. In the column, which appeared twice a month for six years, she profiled more than 400 artists from across the South, including Kaminer Haislip. Her enthusiasm for discovering and writing about Southern artists and their work continues with newsouthfinds.com.

She and Kaminer recently reconnected and she interviewed Kaminer about her current artwork for the December issue of New South Finds. The lovely, complimentary feature is below.

silver pitcher silver cup

Kaminer Haislip wasn’t born with a silver spoon in her mouth. But she creates stunning silver spoons and more in her South Carolina studio.

The artist: Haislip grew up in Aiken, SC, and worked in high school at her family’s True Value hardware and appliance store, cutting keys and working around lots of tools and equipment.

The experience influenced her interest in sculpture, jewelry and working with her hands. So she signed up for an industrial tech class to learn how to weld.

After high school, Haislip earned a BFA in jewelry and metals and an MFA in silversmithing and design from Winthrop University. There she studied under Alfred Ward, an internationally acclaimed silversmith from London.

The company: Founded in 2005Kaminer Haislip Designer + Silversmith is based in Charleston.

The art & materials: Sterling silver hollowware, functional home objects, serving utensils and jewelry. She also works in gold for custom commissioned pieces.

What’s popular:

  • Sounding series hollowware, tumblers, appetizer serving utensils ($140 to $3,250).
  • Oyster jewelry ($110 to $1,735).
  • Baby gifts ($125 to $425).
  • Custom designs.

Other favorites:

  • Oyster dishes ($175 to $500)
  • Bar spoons ($165 to $185)
  • Wine coasters ($415)
  • Men’s accessories ($110 to $325)
  • Christmas ornaments ($70  to $160)

Inspiration: The concept of enhancing domestic rituals through traditional silversmithing techniques coupled with a contemporary yet timeless design.

“For me, using a thought-inspiring yet functional teapot enhances the process of making tea,” she said. “When a beautiful, well-designed object and domestic ritual are united, a connection between person and object occurs — and an appreciation of function results.”

 Fun, special or unusual requests: Custom-designed commissioned work is a big part of her business. This year she had one large commission that stood out.

“It was a large silver globe titled ‘Mother Earth’ (pictured right) that required many different processes and a lot of problem solving. It was one of the most complicated objects I have ever made and I really enjoyed the challenge.

Big break(s): Two notable collaborations, including:

– A silver sculpture titled “Pillinger” created with designer Constantin Boym for the Museum of the City of New York’s exhibition, “New York Silver, Then and Now in 2017.

– A silver Magnolia Bowl for Draper James, a Southern lifestyle company founded by Reese Witherspoon in 2015.

 Awards:

  • SC House of Representatives house resolution honoring artwork and Daughters of the American Revolution American Heritage Award, 2021
  • Daughters of the American Revolution, American Heritage Contest, First Place in Crafts: Jewelry category, 2021
  • Samuel Gaillard Stoney Conservation Craftsmanship Award, Historic Charleston Foundation, 2014
  • Made in the South Awards, Home category, Garden & Gun magazine, 2012

Honors:

  • Her work has been featured in more than sixty publications, including Metalsmith, The Magazine Antiques, Elle Décor, Garden & Gun, and on the TV show Handcrafted America.
  • This year the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, CT, created a film about her work as a silversmith for its “Virtual Visit” series. She collaborated with museum curator Brandy Culp on the project.
  • Her work has been exhibited internationally and nationally, including at The Netherlands Silver Museum in Schoonhoven, the International Design Museum in Munich, and the Metal Museum in Memphis.

What’s new: A small new jewelry collection titled “Gorget Jewelry Series.” ($135 to $175).

Where to buy: kaminerhaislip.com. Also at Helena Fox Fine Art in Charleston.

Get social at: Instagram: @kaminerhaislip

See the full feature on New South Finds’ website at https://newsouthfinds.com/kaminer-haislip/

“How did you get into silversmithing?”

“How did you get into silversmithing?” is one of the most frequently asked questions I receive.

I discuss it briefly in my Bio posted on my website, but I get the same question so often I decided to share more of my story on my Blog.

 

silversmithing studio

Kaminer Haislip working in her silversmithing studio

 

Aiken, South Carolina, which received Southern Living’s 2018 award for The South’s Best Small Town, is my hometown. I grew up in my family’s business True Value Hardware & Appliance, which is located on the main street of Aiken’s historic downtown. My grandfather Bill Franklin started the hardware store as a side project when he was an accountant at Savannah River Site. When my parents Det and Lyanne Haislip were married, my father took over the business.

 

True Value Aiken SC

True Value Hardware & Appliance in historic downtown Aiken, SC

 

As children, my brother Wylie, cousins Anne and Franklin, and I spent a lot of time there, especially at Christmas. As you can see in the picture below, we had so much fun with the toys, go carts, and window displays!

 

hardware store 1980's

Kaminer with her brother and cousins in the hardware store as children in the 1980’s

 

In high school, I worked in the hardware store and that is when my interest began in making sculpture and jewelry. Being around all of the tools and equipment, putting together bikes and toys, and cutting keys is now an obvious connection to how working with my hands became my career.

 

True Value Aiken SC

True Value newspaper feature from 1990’s

 

When I was in high school, I took the industrial tech class, because I wanted to learn how to make sculptures in metal and wood. Being the only girl in the class did not bother me at all and I took to learning welding and wood working immediately. One of my first wood sculptures is shown below. Displayed in a downtown Aiken park not far from my family’s business, it was my first artwork exhibited outside of a school setting.

 

sculpture

Sculpture from high school in 1990’s

 

I knew by then I wanted to be a professional artist and major in jewelry and sculpture in college, so I sought out a college with a strong jewelry and sculpture program. After careful deliberation, I decided the small liberal arts college Winthrop University in Rock Hill, SC would be the best fit for me. Alfred Ward, an English silversmith from London, was head of the jewelry and metals program and I was excited to study under such a renowned silversmith.

 

silver ebony wood spoon

Silver and ebony wood spoon from undergraduate studies

 

The first functional silver object I made studying under Alf was the silver spoon with ebony wood handle shown above. This piece is significant to my work, because it was the first time I laminated silver and wood. I continue to use this method of fabrication for spoon, teapot and coffeepot handles, because it creates strength in the handle and a beautiful line of silver down the center.

 

art gallery

Kaminer and her brother Wylie at her first gallery exhibition

 

From there I was hooked on silversmithing, because it combined my interest in jewelry techniques and sculptural forms. My graduation exhibition with my classmates in Charlotte, NC was my first commercial art gallery exhibit. Pictured above is me with my brother Wylie looking at one of my display cases at the opening reception. After graduating with my BFA in Jewelry and Metals, I moved to Charlotte and started my MFA silversmithing studies under Alf at Winthrop.

 

Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University

Kaminer and her professor Alf at Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University in London, England

 

While in graduate school, I focused on silversmithing and immersed myself in it completely. During that time, I also taught the Jewelry II and III classes and jewelry workshops at Winthrop. Additionally, I interned and was a docent at the Mint Museum, where I learned up close the history of craft and design and how a professional institution operates. During the summer of 2004, I went to London for a family trip and my MFA thesis research. Alf and his wife were in England visiting family, so he was kind enough to meet us in London and show us around. Pictured above is me with Alf in the stake room of Sir John Cass London Metropolitan University, where Alf was formerly head of the silversmithing and jewelry department.

 

silver teapot

Perched Flight silver and ebony wood teapot

 

In 2005 I graduated with my MFA in Silversmithing and Design with a minor in Sculpture. The first teapot I made was Perched Flight and it is silver with an ebony wood handle that is laminated with silver in the center. It was the central piece to my MFA thesis exhibition and after was accepted to five national exhibitions and one international exhibition. I became very attached to it, so it is now in me and my husband’s collection.

Immediately following graduation, I moved to Charleston, South Carolina and established my studio and business. Three years later my husband Matt and I had our wedding reception at the William Aiken House. My hometown was named for William Aiken and he is my great-great-great-great uncle.

 

Charleston Weddings Magazine

Charleston Weddings Magazine feature – see full article on website Press page

 

My path to silversmithing began at a very young age, but it wasn’t until I started my business and began exhibiting my work nationally that people started asking me “How did you get into silversmithing?”. When I thought about it and shared my story, I realized how unusual it is for a girl to grow up in a small southern town hardware store and become a contemporary silversmith. Really?!

For less lengthy answers to frequently asked questions, visit my FAQ page on my website!

 

South Carolina Arts Commission Grant

south carolina arts commission

South Carolina Arts Commission Grant

I am extremely honored and excited to announce the South Carolina Arts Commission has awarded me an Arts Emergency Relief Grant as an individual artist. The grant program was developed to support individual artists and teaching artists who have lost income related to their artistic practice due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

South Carolina artists have reported due to the coronavirus pandemic, 95% have experienced loss, 66% have experienced unanticipated expenditures, and 63% have become fully unemployed. Cancelled events, exhibitions, markets, performances, concerts, festivals, openings, and many more arts related functions that generate revenue and a livelihood for artists have contributed to this astonishing loss. By the South Carolina Arts Commission creating this grant program, they are giving much needed assistance to artists across the state.

All of my exhibitions, shows, and events were cancelled this spring and summer due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Being awarded this grant has really helped off set the financial loss from those cancellations. I am very grateful for this grant and everything they do to assist artists and promote the arts in South Carolina!

In addition to the South Carolina Arts Commission and National Endowment for the Arts, this grant program was funded in part by a generous award from the South Carolina Arts Foundation.

The South Carolina Arts Foundation, a nonprofit organization established in 1972 dedicated to recognizing, encouraging and supporting the art and artists of South Carolina. Throughout its history, the Foundation has pursued creative ways to help the business community and private citizens contribute to a thriving arts community across the state. Learn more about this incredible organization at https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/foundation/

On June 7, 1967, Governor Robert E. McNair signed legislation that established the South Carolina Arts Commission, an autonomous state agency charged with guiding the development of the arts. For 50 years, the agency has worked to build a thriving arts environment that benefits all South Carolinians, regardless of their circumstances or where they live. With a commitment to excellence across the spectrum of the state’s cultures and forms of expression, the organization pursues its public charge to develop a thriving arts environment, which is essential to quality of life, education, and economic vitality for all South Carolinians. For more information on this wonderful organization and all they do for the arts in South Carolina visit https://www.southcarolinaarts.com/

 

 

Kaminer Haislip PechaKucha Presentation

pechakucha presentation charleston music hall
Design by Josh Capeder

Kaminer Haislip PechaKucha Presentation

PechaKucha, a series of rapid-fire presentations from an array of local creatives, had its 36th show in Charleston on Thursday, February 20, 2020 in celebration of the first International PechaKucha Night alongside 1200 other cities. Each presenter had approximately six minutes and forty seconds to discuss 20 specific images related to their profession for 20 seconds each. Emceed by musician and record producer Wolfgang Zimmerman, this lecture series featured head chef/co-owner of Spanish taperia, Malagón Juan Cassalett; designer and silversmith Kaminer Haislip; actor, playwright, and educator Michael Smalwood; and more at the Charleston Music Hall. 

Charleston Music Hall was generous enough to video the presenters and provide their individual presentations for them to share. To view Kaminer Haislip’s PechaKucha presentation, visit the link below!

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

garden & gun charleston sc anniversary issue arts in charleston

Garden & Gun – February/March 2020

The Arts in Charleston Then and Now by Sandy Lang

…take a casual art walk to collector-worthy galleries within steps of one another. The George Gallery houses work from a number of modern artists, including the abstract expressionist William Halsey, the Halsey Institute’s namesake and a pioneer in the Southeast, while at Helena Fox Fine Art, you can take in Savannah native West Fraser’s panoramic Lowcountry landscapes and the oyster-shaped links of necklaces by Charleston silversmith Kaminer Haislip. A few doors down sits Dog & Horse Fine Art, where gallery owner Jaynie Milligan Spector curates (not surprisingly) an array of canine- and equine-themed work. You can even commission a portrait miniature of a beloved spaniel or pointer, in a style reminiscent of those centuries-old human portraits at the Gibbes, to be incorporated into a pendant or a bracelet….

To read the full Garden & Gun article featuring all the best of the arts in Charleston visit https://gardenandgun.com/articles/the-arts-in-charleston-then-and-now/?fbclid=IwAR1MoUGL3z-z-f6kuhk-gMx1IvZz_462zT6pVDit5097iz8AoxYYvwHaDs0

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

post and courier newspaper charleston sc

The Post and Courier Holiday Gift Guide 2019

Need inspiration for holiday gifts? Leave it to the pros: Charleston artists

By Maura Hogan

December 7, 2019

Artistic metal

Silversmith Kaminer Haislip’s jewelry also reflects beautifully on Lowcountry culture. Her artful, modern lines lend a new, fluid twist to Charleston’s favorite bivalve, by way of her sterling silver Oyster Series. From single-shell earrings to luxe linked bracelets, from lustrous cuff links to dreamy dishes, the works join the organic and the minimal to stunning, silvery effect. Prices vary. For more information, visit kaminerhaislip.com

To read the entire holiday gift guide article visit https://www.postandcourier.com/columnists/need-inspiration-for-holiday-gifts-leave-it-to-the-pros/article_6203da7c-16aa-11ea-8dcf-07058c2e613e.html

To shop Kaminer Haislip’s entire silver Oyster Series collection visit https://www.kaminerhaislip.com/store/

Gibbes Museum of Art Store – Exclusive Jewelry Collection

Gibbes Museum of Art Store Charleston art museum
Gibbes Museum of Art downtown Charleston
Gibbes Museum of Art – 135 Meeting Street – Charleston, SC

Gibbes Museum of Art Store – Exclusive Jewelry Collection

I am extremely excited to announce the Gibbes Museum of Art Store, located in historic downtown Charleston, has commissioned an exclusive jewelry collection from me! It was a wonderful compliment when the museum store curator and manager contacted me and said she was interested in a silver jewelry collection that related to an artwork in the museum. After communicating with her and visiting the museum with fresh eyes, I noticed a relationship between Patrick Dougherty’s sculpture installation Betwixt and Between and my Twisted Jewelry Series.

patrick dougherty sculpture installation gibbes museum of art chaleston sc
Betwixt and Between by Patrick Dougherty
Gibbes Museum of Art 2nd Floor Atrium
twisted silver wire necklace handcrafted jewelry
Twisted Necklace by Kaminer Haislip

My Twisted Jewelry Series was inspired by birds intertwining and weaving branches and twigs together to create their nests. Patrick Dougherty’s site-specific sculpture installation Betwixt and Between, located on the 2nd Floor Atrium, also is based on weaving branches and twigs into three dimensional forms that are held together by tension. Dougherty’s large-scale installation made with natural material occupies space the human body can walk around, through, and into. My silver jewelry is small scale in comparison and meant to be worn on the body. Our work relates to one another through process and a relationship to the human form, but varies in medium and scale, which creates a fascinating contrast.

silver twisted wire bracelet kaminer haislip jewelry
Twisted Bracelet by Kaminer Haislip

In this silver jewelry series, I explore the action of twisting silver wire together like a bird would do with branches and twigs. I handcrafted the jewelry individually in my local, Charleston studio, so even though each piece is similar, they are not identical from the hand formed process. The tension put into the silver from the intertwining and wrapping techniques makes it very strong. Therefore, the jewelry pieces are very durable and sturdy, even though they appear delicate.

silver twisted wire earrings handmade jewelry charleston sc
Twisted Earrings by Kaminer Haislip

Twisted Jewelry Series is sold exclusively through the Gibbes Museum of Art Store and can only be purchased through them. Be sure to check out Patrick Dougherty’s sculpture installation while visiting the museum!

silver wrapped wire pendant handcrafted silver jewelry
Twisted Pendant by Kaminer Haislip

To view a wider selection of my silver jewelry and functional, home objects, visit Helena Fox Fine Art, located walking distance nearby at 106-A Church Street.

Classically Contemporary – Helena Fox Fine Art – November 1, 2019

helena fox fine art
helena fox fine art gallery historic charleston sc classically contemporary
Silver Oyster Jewelry by Kaminer Haislip

Classically Contemporary—Where classic techniques and contemporary ideals meet

CHARLESTON, S.C. November 1, 2019—Helena Fox Fine Art is pleased to announce Classically Contemporary featuring artist Julyan Davis and silversmith Kaminer Haislip.

Opening reception during the First Friday Artwalk on November 1 from 5-8pm.

At the intersection of classic techniques and contemporary ideals we find artists Julyan Davis and Kaminer Haislip. Trained in centuries old techniques these two artist draw from their traditional art educations to create pieces which feel both classic and contemporary. From Julyan’s John Constable like paintings of the clouds over the Southern coast to Kaminer’s Georg Jensen like interpretation of the familiar oyster shell, these artists live and breath the history of their chosen mediums.

In his own words, Julyan Davis paints ‘for storytellers—novelists, songwriters, poets. I also paint for those who love history. There has always been a narrative thread in my work. Even when a scene was notably empty of incident, I have strived for a sense that something vital happened here, or that something will.’ The new body of work he will present for our November show continues his movement from strict plein air interpretation towards a more cerebral interpretations—a continuation of the stories told and re-told.

A true master silversmith, Kaminer Haislip studied her craft under internationally acclaimed English silversmith Alfred Ward. She knows historic and modern silver techniques and uses that knowledge to meld form and function into enchanting coffee pots which look as thought they could take flight at any moment or a functional yet funky appetizer fork—or as my momma would have called it a pickle fork. Her work is not only meant to be admired for its shape and beauty but it’s usefulness. For this show we will be highlighting her home collection as well as the oyster collection.

Join us Friday November 1, 2019 between 5-8pm to meet the artists and admire their new work.

Helena Fox Fine Art

106A Church Street

Charleston, SC 29401

843-723-0073

www.helenafoxfineart.com

New Oyster Jewelry Designs

New Oyster Jewelry Designs

My silver Oyster Jewelry Series has been so incredibly popular, I have expanded the collection to include new earrings, necklaces, pendants, and bracelets. I am very excited about these new additions to my oyster jewelry line and spent a lot of time on the designs, construction methods, and wearability of each piece.

What started out as a pair of earrings for a corporate commission based on the Lowcountry oyster has developed into a full collection of original and thoughtful jewelry. When first approached with this corporate gift for a group retreat at Palmetto Bluff, I wanted to create a jewelry design that was a contemporary, abstract interpretation of a Lowcountry theme that mainly is approached literally and cliche. When I began drawing the designs, I focused on designing the oyster shape as organic with enough information it was recognizable but not so much that it was a literal regurgitation of the real form.

I choose square silver wire for the construction, because I wanted the contrast of something organically shaped with geometric material. The four sides of the wire catch the light beautifully and highlight the detailed, hand formed shape of the oyster. The smooth, high shine finish is integral to the design, because the slick surface reflects the light to emphasize the form. Each wire oyster is crafted entirely by hand, which is a labor intensive and time consuming process. The wire shapes look delicate, but in fact they are very strong and durable due to the tension put into the wire from the hand forming process. 

An oyster develops characteristics unique to the waters in which they grow, a metaphor for how place can shape an artist’s work and how Charleston has influenced my artwork. The design has elegant, clean lines that are based on the exterior contour of oyster shells found in Bull’s Bay, just north of Charleston. The shape and repetition of the units in several designs reference the continuous connection to the saltwater marshes surrounding Charleston. By interpreting the form to the essential shape, I came up with a completely original and new design.

Charleston has influenced my silversmithing design of home functional objects since I moved here from Charlotte fifteen years ago. It has been a fun, out of my typical element experience to design an entire jewelry collection inspired by a Charleston theme. As I am sure you can tell, I am very excited about this body of work and hope you will be as well!

To view and Shop the entire collection, visit the Jewelry category of my online store. Thank you for your interest in my work!

Art Mag – Summer 2019

Art Mag Charleston art silversmith visual arts magazine
Art Mag
Summer Issue 2019

Art Mag, a publication publication focused on the arts in Charleston, SC, highlighted Kaminer Haislip’s silver hollowware vessel Gradual Erosion being included in the international silver exhibition Schoonhoven Silver Award. To learn more about this exhibition, visit the Blog on this website. Many thanks to Art Mag for such a lovely interview and feature!

SCHOONHOVEN SILVER AWARD

by Emily Reyna

silver vessel hollowware contemporary silver vase
Gradual Erosion by Kaminer Haislip

Charleston makes its way across the pond to Europe where local artist and silversmith Kaminer Haislip will exhibit her silver vessel, Gradual Erosion.

“It was an incredible honor to have my silver vessel, Gradual Erosion, selected for the international Schoonhoven Silver Award. The opportunity to share my silver work with a European audience in both Schoonhoven, The Netherlands and Freiberg, Germany is very much appreciated,” says Haislip. “It’s the second time my silver hollowware has been exhibited in this special silver exhibition, and it’s a wonderful compliment.”

silversmith Kaminer Haislip artist studio Charleston, SC
Kaminer Haislip in her Charleston silversmithing studio

The piece’s name is inspiration by natural erosion. “The vessel form was based on a mountain shape and the etched surface lines are my own artistic interpretation of the gradual linear disintegration. The erosion begins at the base of the vessel, so the center line is tapered in to portray the slow breakdown of the mountain over time. The concept of erosion relates to the passing of time, what is lost, and what is taken away,” Haislip explains.

Technique and craft are central to Haislip’s creative process when working with fine metals. “I crafted the vessel by fabricating sterling silver sheet, which was hammered over five different cast iron stakes to create the asymmetrical shape,” describes Haislip. “The linear surface design was drawn by hand and etched with nitric acid to create the erosion inspired texture. All aspects of the construction were done entirely by hand utilizing traditional silversmithing techniques.”

Gradual Erosion will be on view at the City and Mining Museum in Freiberg, Germany from June 29 – October 2019.

Visit Art Mag at the link below for this article and many more exciting articles about the arts in Charleston!